My Cat won't Stop Spraying In The House

 

Ask A Vet: Jo Lewis BSc BVMS (Hons) MRCVS

My Cat Is Spraying In The House

My cat won't stop spraying in the house. He isn't stressed... It seems more of a habit. He will be sleeping on my lap very content then just get up, stretch and spray against something. We can't trust him in the house, we already had to replace a kettle and TV. He is having calm food from hills I think, and that seems to make a bit of a difference.

At night and when we are out he sleeps in a dog crate with his food, bedding, etc. Feliway didn't work. Any advice? We just want him to have a better life than just staying in the kitchen and odd visits to the sitting room that stress us out because we can't trust him.

Thanks

 

Hi, Marking is a normal cat behaviour but when it involves spraying urine in the home it is a clue that your cat is feeling anxious in his environment. Feliway has a definite role to play but will not solve the problem on its own. "House soiling" as we call it, can be a common and complicated issue that takes a lot of background research about your cat's health and your home layout and routines.

Although from the outside you might think he's not stressed - the sad reality is that given what he's doing, there are likely to be things making him feel uneasy that you may not even have considered. Although I can see that you are desperate to stop the spraying, confining him as you have said is not a long term option and will make him feel even more stressed - especially without making some structured changes to his environment in the meantime.

On a positive note, rest assured there are lots of simple things that can be done to try and help but you need to be prepared to think like a cat. It's amazing what can actually be causing unintentional stress and sometimes how quickly this can be changed. If you visit this page on my website http://www.thecatvet.co.uk/news-feed.html and scroll down, there is a link to download an article on House Soiling which should help give you an idea on what sorts of things will help. You may well need to invest in a consultation with a cat behaviourist - I can recommend Vicky Halls - she is fantastic!

Best wishes

Jo Lewis BSc BVMS (Hons) MRCVS 

Home Visiting Clinic

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The Cat Vet