Dog & Cat Nutritional Advice & Recipes
Saturday, 03 November 2018 18:52

Switching Your Dog to a Raw diet

 

Making The Switch

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Just a few years ago, raw feeding for dogs and cats was the best-kept secret of many of the top breeders and show people but was not a diet considered by the mainstream pet owners.

In recent times, the benefits of raw have been recognised and, with the increasing number of producers of complete foods, it is now becoming the choice of those pet owners who want the very best for their loved ones.

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HOW DO I MAKE THE CHANGE?

The answer is relatively easy.

The younger and healthier dogs can move over to a raw diet straight away but you may want to do a 2-3 day weaning process with dogs who are older or who are not in the peak of health.

We would not suggest mixing a wet and dry food in the same bowl and so it would be preferable to feed the morning meal of raw and the evening meal of the old food.

All you need to do then is see that there are no stomach upsets and the dog seems happy before changing both meals over.

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MY DOG IS NOT KEEN

Usually dogs instinctively like raw meat and so there are not too many problems with introducing the change. However, if he doesn’t seem to take to it the first time here are some helpful hints:

• Form the food into small mouthful sized balls

• Add warm water from the kettle to bring out the meaty smells

• Add some low-fat natural yoghurt to the food

• Feed on a plate rather than a bowl as this can help the dog deal with a new consistency

• Put some gravy juices on the food or some oil from a can of tuna

• Try a different flavour

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DETOXING

When switching from a highly processed food to a raw diet there can occasionally be a detoxifying process which can show itself in tear staining, loose poos, shedding or coat imbalances.

This should not last more than a week so do consult your vet if they continue.

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WILL I NOTICE ANY CHANGES?

Some changes are immediate.

The amount of poo your dog produces should significantly reduce as there are no grains, carbs or fillers in raw which can increase ‘output’ by up to 75%.

Remember the white dog poo we used to see as kids? This is what you will see again in the summer months. Poo should be firm, dryer and smaller.

Coats should start to feel soft and shiny. Any greasiness or dandruff will clear within just a few days and all ‘doggy’ odours from the coat should disappear.

And talking of smells, and particularly windy dogs will become much more socially acceptable within 24 hours, as there is no residual material left in the gut with raw as there is from processed foods.

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CAN I TRY BEFORE I BUY?

Trying your dog on raw for one or two meals will not affect its health in any way and so you may wish to make a meal for your dog first to see how he likes it.

 

 

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Here is a basic recipe for a DIY meal.

For one meal (half daily allowance) for a 10kg adult dog:

Feeding guide for dogs fed twice a day:

10kg dog - 100g per meal

15kg dog - 150g per meal

20kg dog - 200g per meal

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You will need:

90g of diced chicken or turkey

10g of ground or pureed vegetables. We recommend carrot, broccoli, pumpkin, squash or leafy greens. Avoid other root vegetables and peas. No onion.

x1 Teaspoon of Apple Cider Vinegar

x1 Dessertspoon of raw egg and half the egg shell - the eggshell is replacing the calcium that you would normally get with the ground bone you find in commercial raw diets and complete home-made diets.

x1 Dessertspoon of a low fat live natural yoghurt or the same amount of goats milk

x1 Teaspoon Coconut oil - if this is not available a teaspoon of salmon oil or olive oil.

Try adding some parsley as it is great for fresh breath or a quarter teaspoon of turmeric.

Once you are happy your dog has enjoyed the food with no ill effects then you will want to have a look at a more balanced raw diet which contains bone and offal, but this is a great way of seeing how it works for you and your pet and a really easy enjoyable occasional meal too.

This can be frozen but will stay fresh in the fridge for 2-3 days.

 

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Published in Blog - All articles
Monday, 10 September 2018 04:52

Fruit & Veg For Your Dog

 

Fruit and vegetables which you can feed safely to your dog

These amazing ingredients are packed full of natural goodness - so get down to your local store and load up!

Your fur family will thank you!

iStock 858711006

 

Plums

Plums are great for dogs, you must never feed the stone.

They are a high source of fibre both soluble and insoluble which are vital for maintaining intestinal health and regularity.

A high source of vitamin C and K a great fat-soluble vitamin for immune support.

 

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Courgette

Rich in Vitamin C, potassium and magnesium this low-calorie vegetable is a great source of fibre.

Packed with phytonutrients like lutein and zeaxanthin which are great for eye health.

vegetables 2356884 960 720

 

Broccoli

Is known to be one of the best anti-cancer vegetables.

Most nutrients are found in the stem but all parts of the vegetable can be fed. Packed with vitamin A, C & K it’s low in fat and high in fibre. 


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Pepper

Any colour

Red, yellow, orange or green is all great for your dog.

Loaded with water peppers make a great snack for renal dogs or part of weightless diets. Rich in Vitamin A, B6, C, E & K they are full of antioxidants protecting the body against free radicals.

 

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Mango

Mangoes are not only sweet, but they are rich in fibre. High in vitamin A, B6, C & E this fruit is a sweet immune supportive treat.

Mangos are not only full of antioxidants they also contain quercetin which is fantastic for decreasing inflammation, especially in dogs with allergies.

 

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Raspberries

Packed with antioxidants these yummy berries are a great source of magnesium, Vitamin C both important for a healthy immune-system and minerals potassium and manganese supporting tendon health.

 

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Blackberries

Naturally self-selected by many dogs for their powerful antioxidant content, helping to reduce free radical damage on cells.

Packed with vitamin A, C, E & K for heart and skin health.

 

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Pumpkin

Pumpkin is highly nutritious, rich in fibre supporting a healthy microbiota. It’s packed full of potassium to support healthy muscle function.

Rich in Vitamin C and beta-carotene for immunity and eye health. Its zinc content is also supportive of skin and coat health.

 

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Asparagus

Asparagus is a great veggie for gut health, containing amino acid asparagine, which acts as a natural diuretic supporting urinary tract health.

It also contains vitamin A, B6, C,E & K as well as minerals iron, copper and calcium.

appetite 2038 960 720

Article by Different Dog

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View our site here 

Telephone: 01743 384 562

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❛ Our Dog Food. It's Different ❜

New menu every week. Cooked like you would at home. Delivered to your bowl.  Different Dog is the first dog food company to cook a different recipe every week.

Prepared and cooked by hand, their food contains only fresh, seasonal ingredients and a lot of Lshaded 304508 960 720 V E.

dd 030 2 

 

 
 
 
 
Published in Nutrition
Monday, 27 August 2018 18:31

Easy To Make Bone Broth for Dogs

A simple bone broth recipe like the one below is incredibly easy and cheap to make. 

grey bone

Published in Popular Articles
Wednesday, 06 June 2018 09:54

Healthy Fruit & Veg For Your Dog

 

Fruit and vegetables which you can feed safely to your dog

These amazing ingredients are packed full of natural goodness - so get down to your local store and load up!

Your fur family will thank you!

iStock 858711006

 

Plums

Plums are great for dogs, you must never feed the stone.

They are a high source of fibre both soluble and insoluble which are vital for maintaining intestinal health and regularity.

A high source of vitamin C and K a great fat-soluble vitamin for immune support.

 

fruits 2202430 960 720

Courgette

Rich in Vitamin C, potassium and magnesium this low-calorie vegetable is a great source of fibre.

Packed with phytonutrients like lutein and zeaxanthin which are great for eye health.

 

vegetables 2356884 960 720

 

Broccoli

Is known to be one of the best anti-cancer vegetables.

Most nutrients are found in the stem but all parts of the vegetable can be fed. Packed with vitamin A, C & K it’s low in fat and high in fibre. 

 


appetite 1239149 960 720

 

 

Pepper

Any colour

Red, yellow, orange or green are all great for your dog.

Loaded with water peppers make a great snack for renal dogs or part of weightless diets. Rich in Vitamin A, B6, C, E & K they are full of antioxidants protecting the body against free radicals.

 

peppers 154377 960 720

Mango

Mangoes are not only sweet, but they are rich in fibre. High in vitamin A, B6, C & E this fruit is a sweet immune supportive treat.

Mangos are not only full of antioxidants they also contain quercetin which is fantastic for decreasing inflammation, especially in dogs with allergies.

 

background 1239241 960 720

Raspberries

Packed with antioxidants these yummy berries are a great source of magnesium, Vitamin C both important for a healthy immune-system and minerals potassium and manganese supporting tendon health.

 

berry 2270 960 720

Blackberries

Naturally self selected by many dogs for their powerful antioxidant content, helping to reduce free radical damage on cells.

Packed with vitamin A, C, E & K for heart and skin health.

 

berry 2275 960 720

Pumpkin

Pumpkin is highly nutritious, rich in fibre supporting a healthy microbiota. It’s packed full of potassium to support healthy muscle function.

Rich in Vitamin C and beta-carotene for immunity and eye health. Its zinc content is also supportive of skin and coat health.

 

autumn 72294 960 720

Asparagus

Asparagus is a great veggie for gut health, containing amino acid asparagine, which acts as a natural diuretic supporting urinary tract health.

It also contains vitamin A, B6, C,E & K as well as minerals iron, copper and calcium.

appetite 2038 960 720

Article by Different Dog

different dog logo tranparent

View our site here 

Telephone: 01743 384 562

facebook logo   twitter    instagram cropped

❛ Our Dog Food. It's Different ❜

New menu every week. Cooked like you would at home. Delivered to your bowl.  Different Dog is the first dog food company to cook a different recipe every week.

Prepared and cooked by hand, their food contains only fresh, seasonal ingredients and a lot of Lshaded 304508 960 720 V E.

 

dd 030 2

 

 
 
 
 

Fruit & Veg That Your Dog Will Find Ap'peeling

It’s not always easy to know what’s best for your dog’s health. Sure, quality dog food is necessary, since it already has all the supplements your dog needs. But, these supplements can also come under the form of human food, such as fruits and vegetables.

Yes, you might not believe it, but dogs can eat fruits and veggies just like human beings, and they love them. It doesn’t matter if your dog is a Corgi or a Pomsky, he will definitely enjoy the foods on this list!

So, without further ado, here are 6 ways you can improve your dog’s diet using fresh fruits and vegetables!

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1. Bananas

For Potassium

You might not believe it at first, but dogs can and will eat bananas, since they thoroughly enjoy them.

If your dog has an inflamed colon or bowel problems and you don’t know what to do about it, feed him bananas! It may sound crazy, but bananas are extremely healthy, for dogs and humans alike.

Not only are they full of potassium, they also contain fiber, carbohydrates, and magnesium, which are all an added plus for your dog’s health.

But (as there is always a but in this kind of situations), only use bananas as treats. As good as these tropical fruits are for our furry friends, too much of them could cause constipation or high blood sugar.

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Now, how can you feed your dog bananas?

Well, veterinarians recommend to mash them into your best friend’s food, mix them with yogurt (yes, dogs can eat that too), or peel them, cut them, freeze them, and use them as treats when your dog is being a good boy!

 

Banana

 

2.  Apples

Antioxidants and Calcium 

As the saying goes: “One apple a day keeps the doctor away.” 

This is not only true for humans though, since it always works for dogs! (And we all know how much dogs hate going to the vet).

Apples are a token of heaven, full of calcium, Vitamin C, antioxidants, and other goodies such as fiber and potassium. They’re the perfect treat for dogs, as long as you remember to take the core out, since it contains cyanide, which is, obviously, poisonous.

Low in protein and fats, apples are perfect for old dogs whose health you should pay attention to. You can feed your dogs small slices of apple, or you can also follow this recipe and make your dog the perfect apple flavored treat!

 

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Cucumber

Minerals

Cucumber might come off as a boring food to children (and some adults who are picky eaters), but dogs absolutely adore them. And by “adore”, I mean that these precious animals can wolf down a whole cucumber without giving it a second thought (though don’t let your dog do that as he might choke, which is obviously not a good result).

Feeding your best friend cucumber is a great way to keep him hydrated, so use it as a treat for him, especially during hot summer days.

But, remember, even a good thing can turn bad if there’s too much of it. So don’t feed your dog too much cucumber, as he might get sick (and no one wants to deal with a dog’s Diarrhoea (diarrhea)).

 zayn 3

 

Mango 

Vitamin A

Mangoes are not only great for humans, they’re also a perfect treat for our furry friends. 

This sweet tropical fruit is loaded with vitamin A, minerals, and potassium, which is why you should feed it to your dog.

mango

 

But, be careful. As always, take off the core, since not only is it a choking hazard, it also contains cyanide, which is, as we stated before, poisonous. The best way then to feed your dog mango would be to peel it first (as the skin could cause a stomach ache) and cut it into small cubes, then feed it to your dog as a treat.

Believe us, your best friend will thank you for that, as he’ll enjoy the sweetness and freshness of the fruit.

 zayn 4

 

Bell Peppers

Vitamin C

Especially red bell peppers, since they also have a high content of beta-carotene and antioxidants, which are great for your dog!

Not only that, but bell peppers are also low in calories, which makes them extremely healthy!

But, never feed your dog spicy peppers, as these can actually be poisonous. Instead, go for the mild ones (which we humans usually use for salad) and use them as treats, of course, all in moderation.

 

 

zayn 5

 

And finally...

Add A Whole Bunch of Vitamins by Using Cabbage

Yes, cabbage is bland, and yet, dogs go crazy for it! Full of vitamins, this vegetable is a perfect treat after a good run!

Not only is cabbage great for your dog’s skin and coat, it can also help prevent cancer, which is always a plus. It doesn’t hurt that it also helps with your dog’s digestion. But, feed it to him in moderation, as it can cause gas, which is uncomfortable for both parties (have you ever smelled a dog’s fart? Yeah, it’s not really great).

 

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And remember, always make sure to ask your veterinarian before adding new food to your dog’s diet. It never hurts to be careful!

 

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Article By Sarah Zayn | Diamond Pup 

 

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On Diamond Pup you can find what you need to know about dogs and their breeds.

We cover everything from their origins to their training, nutrition, and even where to get one.

 

Visit their website: DiamondPup

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Published in Nutrition
Tuesday, 14 March 2017 16:05

The Benefits of Coconut Oil

 

Coconut oil is all the rage right now, with consumption up 40% year on year since 2010.

But is it a passing fad, or are the health benefits so great we should be shovelling it into the dog as well as ourselves?

The answer is yes, and no. Like most food supplements you get what you pay for and there’s no point diligently putting cheap coconut oil on to your dog’s dinner every day because you won’t get the benefit. Better to spend more and get way more bang for your buck. .... Here’s why.

 

coconut oil article

 

Coconut oil is a superfood

Coconut oil is actually coconut fat. It is commonly referred to as oil because it originates from hot, tropical countries where it can stay liquid at room temperature. The key fat is Lauric acid which, along with it’s siblings; Caprylic, Decanoic, Myristic, Palmitic and Oleic acids, forms a group of good fats known as medium chain triglycerides (MCTs,) and these are why coconut oil is classed as a superfood.

Lauric acid is the superstar MCT though as you will only find this fatty acid in such quantities in coconuts or breast milk, and believe me coconut oil is way easier to find in the shops!

As such Lauric acid is sort after in it’s own right (think Beyonce after Destiny’s Child) separated from coconut oil in the processing to be used in medicine. Lauric acid is used to treat viral infections, swine and avian flu and herpes. It is also used for preventing the transmission of HIV from mothers to children. It’s a thoroughly good thing.

So why haven’t we always eaten it? Well, like everyone else in the West we avoided saturated fats for years, now we are simply playing catch up with India and South East Asia who have been growing and consuming coconut for millennia.

 iStock 77476163 SMALL

 

The benefits of coconut oil for your dog

Where do I start?

OK, coconut oil is a very good source of energy. It has well documented antibacterial, antiviral and anti-fungal properties too. However, there are so many uses I’ve broken it down into external and internal uses.

 

External uses – rub on to:

* hot spots

• dry skin

• eczema

• fungal rashes

• ringworm

• wounds

• flea bites

• insect stings

• contact dermatitis

 

Internal uses – add to food to:

• improve skin and coat condition

• improve digestion

• even out sugar levels

• aid arthritis and other mobility issues

• clear up yeast in the gut and on the skin

• help prevent infection

• aid weight loss through increasing the metabolism and balancing the thyroid

• get rid of that doggy smell

• help to reduce allergies

 

 

coconuts

 

How much coconut oil should I feed my dog?

Start gradually at ¼ tsp per day and build up. Work up to 1tsp per 10kg of body weight up to a maximum of 3tsp per day.

Then go by what works for your dog. If you discover oily stools then reduce the amount fed. If your dog is overweight reduce the amount by half. Then see how it goes for a couple of weeks and adjust accordingly.

Now you know the health benefits of giving coconut oil to your dog the big question is – which type of coconut oil should I buy or, put another way, why should I spend a tenner on a jar when I can get one for two quid? Well…..

There are three main types of coconut oil available in the UK

Coconut oil is produced in two main ways; either from copra (see below) and refined, or by extracting it from coconut meat without refining.

 

Copra

Copra is dried coconut meat sold in bulk around the world and eaten in one form or another by millions. It is produced by splitting coconuts in half and allowing them to dry out; by smoking, under the sun, or dried in a kiln. This dried coconut meat is pretty inedible and needs refining to make your run of the mill coconut oil.

 

Coconut oil – RBD refined

Oil which is simply labelled ‘coconut oil’ is made from copra and likely to be mass produced into what is known as RBD oil; refined, bleached and deodorised. Before you go into a flat spin, the ‘bleaching’ is more of a filtering process to remove impurities, and the deodorising is done with steam.

However, solvents such as hexane are sometimes used and it’s unclear whether hexane residues remain after processing. The end result is a bland oil that still has all it’s important fatty acids intact.

This refining process does, however, strip out some of the nutrients which cold pressed, virgin oils test higher for.

 

Liquid coconut oil

In our cooler climate, coconut oil (which is actually mostly fat) stays solid at room temperature. It also has quite a low smoke point, so now we have ‘liquid’ coconut oil, which stays liquid even in the fridge. Great, eh?

Well, no actually, liquid coconut oil has had the lauric acid removed from it and is the by-product left behind. We want the lauric acid, it’s the good bit which makes coconut oil a superfood. So fine if you want something with a high smoke point for cooking with but it doesn’t have the significant health benefits of it’s ‘solid at room temperature’ sibling.

 

Virgin coconut oil

By far the best for nutrition, health benefits, and taste, virgin coconut oil is made by pushing dried coconut meat through a machine known as an expeller. This separates the oil from the meat. What’s left is then sent off for further processing such as desiccation, milling etc.

Another way to make virgin coconut oil is by wet-milling where the fresh coconut milk is extracted from wet coconut meat. The oil is separated from the coconut water by fermentation.

Either way, you’re looking for virgin coconut oil. If you see extra virgin the phrase is meaningless, it’s no better than ‘virgin’. I mean, how is it possible to be ‘more’ virgin? You either are or you aren’t!

 

Coconut Oil for Dogs

Coconut Oil for Dogs

Complementary Food For Dogs   For Dogs, Cat..

£8.99

 

 

To sum up:

1. Look for cold pressed, virgin coconut oil.

2. Avoid oil labelled simply coconut oil, it will be refined

3. Don’t bother with ‘liquid’ coconut oil. It’s had the very thing which makes it ‘super’ removed.

4. Don’t worry about buying organic, coconuts grow 60ft off the ground, no one gets sprayed at that height!

5. Don’t bother with labels that state their oil is made using non-GM coconuts – all coconuts are non-GM, it’s a marketing ploy.

6. Always read the label

7. If your dog won’t eat it have a go at hiding it in these tasty dog treats

 iStock 543442836

 

The Mutts Nuts Dog Biscuits

Ingredients

110g of smooth peanut butter (the one with no added anything, just peanuts)

85g of honey

1 tablespoon of virgin coconut oil

225ml of homemade chicken stock

150g rolled oats

250g coconut flour

 

Method

Heat the oven to 175C, 350F or gas 4.

1.  Mix together the peanut butter, honey, coconut oil and chicken broth. In a separate bowl, combine the rolled oats and coconut flour.

2.  Tip the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients. Mix together well until you have a dough you can roll out. If the mix is too dry add a little water or leftover stock. If it’s too wet add a little more flour.

3.  On a floured surface roll the dough out to about ¼ inch thick. Use a small cutter to cut out the biscuits, whichever size is right for your dog.

4.  Transfer the biscuits to a lined baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes or until done.

5.  Leave to cool for a minute then transfer on to a cooling rack.

These will keep in an airtight container for up to a week. Or you can freeze them.

   

 

Published in Popular Articles